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20131105
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. >> a look now at the cost of higher education. heads of universities in inyland, north carolina meet capitol hill to talk about higher education at lower cost. lawmakers are considering changes to the higher education act which is said to expire at year's end. two hours.ut >> today is the second in our series to examine post secondary education. discuss is ofill interest to policymakers -- that is innovation in higher education. we have spent time in this committee discussing the role of innovation, but much of that was focused on college affordability. while that is of paramount importance, we would like to thed this hearing examining landscape of innovations in higher education that increase student learning, engagement, and degree completion. if our nation is going to , we needore students to do more to ensure students are persisting towards and obtaining quality degrees. what can colleges and universities do to maximize learning and support? to ensure students are getting through on time, or faster and earning a meaningful credential. today's panel explores efforts and progress at the in
and environmental policy, infrastructure, education, figuring out how to cause the median income of the average american to rise again which it has not been doing, to re-institute growth in the economy. he did not say this but others have said it, that the republican party needs an organization like the one that moderate democrats created after the debacles of mcgovernite liberalism, the leadership council. such an organization would develop policies and make a relevantive philosophy to ordinary people around the country and convince them that republicans have ways to make their lives better. and make the republican party the opportunity party again that jack can always wanted it to be and also the party of lincoln. there are lots of reformed republicans around. some of them are in dc and some of them are out in the states. what they need is a gathering place and a trumpet and a rallying center. the kemp foundation has the potential to be that organization. i hope you will find ways to , witht so with your time your ideas, and, yes, with your money. so now, the video. enjoy your salads. if you
to invest and the essential pillars of economic growth like education, workforce readiness, science, research and innovation. i believe there are significant savings that can be achieved in our health care system without compromising the quality of care, and in fact, improving the quality of care. and without slashing benefits that seniors have worked so hard for and earned. former secretary-treasurer he paul o'neill has estimated we can save $1 trillion per year without affecting health care outcomes by in acting smart, targeted health care delivery reforms. the institute of medicine estimated the number could be 750 billion dollars. no matter what the exact figure or proposal, these are impressive savings that would strengthen the nation's health- care system without shifting cost and burdens to seniors and states. these have the added benefit of improving quality, -- quality outcomes within the health-care system. so before we continue to obsessively but benefits on the table, i would hope to begin the dialogue about finding solutions that produce health-care cost savings. i am c
health education labor and pensions committee this week. appeared before the house ways and means committee last week and her hearing before the andte will be this tuesday we will have coverage here on c- span. 's just saw kathleen sibelius testimony. she will be making another appearance on capitol hill, testifying before the senate finance committee on wednesday at 10:00 eastern, also on c- span. presidentialan candidate mitt romney talked about health care law and its implementation under the obama administration on "meet the press." he talked about how the federal law differs from the one he enacted in massachusetts when he was governor and the potential impact he thinks the problems could have on the rest of president obama's term. state should be able through the laboratory of democracy model to put in place the plan that works best for them and if they adopt the massachusetts plan, terrific. if they adopt a different plan, that's fine. recognize that massachusetts teaches some important lessons some states are not going to follow. one lesson is health insurance is more expe
. some of it must have been the result of his jesuit education and his experience as a debater. a friend of his is here who knew him and debated with him and told me that at 16, he was just a wonderful, great man, even though he was just a young man at that time. i never knew, really, exactly why he always knew the right thing to say and do. perhaps it was his honesty and his resolve to keep his word. i do not know. i think back on our almost 45 years together and i think of the long meanings -- meetings that perhaps best displayed his ability to reason with people. 'ability to reason with people. one of them was in the old -- in the late 1960's. he had accepted the challenge of a man whose name i think was virgil. who was opposed to any form of gun control. he claimed thanh was -- tom was for every form of gun control. , agreed to appear at this forum at this local high school. virgil as in the newspapers, "i was able to attract -- i think he also wrote on radio and television -- an audience of about 700 people, tom stood on the stage 45.5 hours and answered all of the allegations with
thing where we spent a great deal of time is our educational system urge -- system. have more students country than any other in our educational system. why do they come here, it is not just the quality of education, but the type of education. i think some of the disadvantages of education globally, so many people are taught facts. this might work very well for i am notcores -- and trying to diminish that at all. i do believe the american style of learning should get more credit in the ability to be thoughtful and critical thinking. as an employer who this year we hired 1100 employees and the year before we hired 1100 overyees, i would tell you 80% of the employees come from u.s. universities. we will continue to have that. as an employer and some of you has offices and 38 countries, the bulk of our employees comes from the united states and we are looking for people who know how to think and think creatively. >> thank you, larry. let shift to bill. from allst retailer over the world -- trying to increase the sourcing you're doing here in the united states. could you give us perspectiv
back to a point where you go through the normal process of moving the bills, the labor education bill, the defense bill, move them all individually. there is not enough time when we talk about the calendar. there is not enough time to move all of the bills individually at this point. host: sarah from dover, pennsylvania. caller: good morning. i would like to change the subject a little bit if i can. i live on medicare. the medicare and food stamps -- i am surviving on $125 a week. if they take food stamps away from me -- the -- [indiscernible] he needs to feeds us first before he feeds anyone else. and also, we have a place to live. our guys come home from the service. they are losing because they have no place to live. i would like to see that to happen, too. thank you. host: there is a story in politico. the headline talks about the farm bill that it gets no respect, referencing rodney dangerfield. why is this an important discussion happening? guest: the last time we had a farm bill, that law expired in 2008. what is it, 2013? it has been five years since we had a new farm bill pas
budget also invests in our nation's most valuable resource, our kids, by boosting support for education, including an early education initiative. the republican budget in the house resulted in the cut of 20% below sequester levels to that part of the budget that funds education. these choices have real consequences. we also know that the deep, immediate sequester cuts are hurting our economy. the non-partisan congressional budget office tells us to meet our defense and national priorities will result in 800,000 fewer american jobs by this time next year. we all know there are smarter ays to reduce deaf -- to equal deficit reduction. in the house, many have offered to plan a quest sequester with balanced cuts to wasteful spending and cuts to unproductive special interest tax breaks. unfortunately we have been denied an opportunity to vote often that plan. finally, this committee should continue to work to shrink the debt. over the last few years, we have cut the 10-year deficit by over 2.7 trillion, excluding the sequester. three-quarters of those savings come from budget cuts. one quart
we do not have. senator kerry was talking earlier about the excellence in u.s. higher education, how that has always helped us, training more and better engineers, but those days are ending. so our natural design advantages are going to be harder to come by going forward. and so we need those things, so we are not starting with a 10% cost disadvantage. >> in asia. what would it mean for caterpillar? >> we have a huge business in asia and growing. that is the single largest opportunity over the next decade or so. we intend to lead market. but again, i come back to the point that it is likely that a lot of those countries, a number of those, will do agreements with or without us. if we don't get tpp done. we will look into a market that we ought to be competing with. i'll move to africa because i am passionate about this. we watched the chinese really take over africa. they've come in with their own financing, their own engineering, sometimes their own workers to take over minerals, extraction, oil and gas, hydroelectric power across africa. i know, michael, that is on your agenda. but
will be able to come. ine education system afghanistan, not just higher education. universities, the number that was given to me is so i don'ttuitive use it. in terms of the lower grades before you get to colleges and universities, before the taliban was driven out to the been, 900,000ave boys in afghan schools ten or so.ago now 8 million students in schools. about 3 million of those are girls. none of whom could have been educated before we got there allies.r in 2001, under the taliban were 20,000 teachers, all male. now 200,000 teachers. 60,000 of whom are women. healthcare many improved. significantlyty down. refugeeslion afghan who fled to pakistan have returned home. that 67% of the a mostan people in recent survey think that the afghan war was not worth fighting? how did that happen? the picture is much, number.tter than that i just don't believe that the american people have had a fair or fuller picture of the events in afghanistan. that the press has story. a good it hasn't missed the problems. it has missed the progress. our peoplesion that either.sn't come from it comes from what
constructive on the united states and where we spend a great deal of time is our educational system, which unfortunately a lot of people malign that today. this will be discussed later, but we actually have more students overseas than any other country in our educational system. what you come here? it is not just the quality of education, but the type of education. some of the disadvantages of education globally, so many people are taught rote or talk facts. this may work very well or testing scores, and i'm not trying to diminish that at all. but i do believe that the advantage of the american style of learning, which should get more credit, is the ability to be thoughtful and critical thinking. as an employer who hired 1100 employees this year, i will tell you over 80% of our employees come from u.s. universities. we will continue to have that position. as an employer who has offices in 38 countries, the bulk of our employees come from the united states universities, and what we are looking for, people who know how to think and think creatively. >> thank you, larry. let's shift to bill.
was in 1979 through its education programs. back then as a commercial banker, i took an underwriting course. 1983, run record recruited me mccord recruited me. him,hose of you who know you know how convincing he can be. shortly after joining his team, i attended my first convention. how things have changed in early years. 10 years later in 1994, i attended my first commercial real estate conference. almost everyed year since. since 2008, we serve and is a credible educational guide and networking opportunity that brought value to my career. it still does today. since that time, i have learned the important role that advocacy can play in advancing my business and the industry as a whole. i have had the opportunity to devote much more my time to mba advocacy efforts in recent years. not only have i seen firsthand how effective advocacy is, i've also seen how important the role of member engagement plays in advocacy. i have done this with a complete support of my firm who recognize the value i brought home by increasing my involvement with mba. now the of understanding of where i came from, al
system, our education system, our access to energy, could make this a platform that every country around the world wants to be in. and growth here at home. >> we will close down. thank you so much for all of thoughts. well done. [ applause ] >> tonight, on c-span. armed services committee chairman senator carl levin inlks about the situation afghanistan. followed by remarks from obama and prime minister of iraq nouri themaliki and remarks at antidefamanion league. week, michigan senator carl levin traveled to and met with president karzai. today, the senate armed services committee chairman about improvements in the country as the u.s. and prepare to remove troops from afghanistan in 2014. from the council on foreign relations. is an hour. >> welcome to the foreign relations. i'm johnathan karl. a high honor to be here with levin. introduction.s no interduck carl levin is the chairman of the senate armed services from the great state of michigan and of special interest to me, just back from a trip to afghanistan where he commanders over there and also had a one on one president karzai. i
innovation and education because of the nature of our communities and the structure and the openness with which they operate. that people will have access here because we will continue to work hard to make sure that we have the most qualified workers one of the largest consumer market in the world. this, i do not say any of with one bit of arrogance. good newsecause that for america is also good news for the world. it is good news for you and your businesses. nina the importance of the american economy in terms of driving china's economy and other economies in the world. their importance is driving other economies in the region and elsewhere. it is a principle reason why we should invest in here. it is a top priority at a level i might any before. -- unlike any before. you're sitting here in the hot -- heart of the most open economy in the world. the u.s. is the largest recipient of direct investment. manufacturing was mentioned. we have about 5.6 million total good paying american jobs contribute in close to when chilean dollars to our economy that comes from foreign direct investme
the excellence in u.s. higher education, how that helped us, training more and better engineers, but those days are ending. so our natural design advantages are going to be harder to come by going forward. and so we need those things, so we are not starting with a 10% cost disadvantage. >> in asia. what would it mean for caterpillar? >> we have a huge business in asia and growing. that is the single largest opportunity over the next decade or so. we intend to be that market. but again, i come back to the point that it is likely that a lot of those countries, a number of those, will do agreements with or without us. if we don't get tpp done. we will look into a market that we ought to be competing with. i'll move to africa because i am passionate about this. we watched the chinese really take over africa. they've come in with their own financing, their own engineering, sometimes their own workers to take over minerals, extraction, oil and gas, hydroelectric power across africa. i know, michael, that is on your agenda. but i am so pleased to hear that the crossover between commerce and the state,
create jobs. we could keep harmful cuts to education programs, or we could give more kids a head start. hire more teachers in math and science and help more kids afford a college education. we can keep doling out corporate welfare, or we can invest in renewable energy that creates jobs and lowers carbon pollution. priorities, choices, that is what this is about. and the stakes for the middle class couldn't be higher. if we don't pick the right priorities now, make the right choices now, we could hinder growth and opportunity for decades and leave our children with something less. that includes the obsession with cutting just for the sake of cutting. that doesn't help our economy grow. it will hold us back. remember, our deficits are getting smaller, not bigger. on my watch their falling at the fastest pace in 60 years. that gives us room to fix our long-term debt problems without sticking it to young people or undermining our bedrock retirement and health security programs or cutting basic research that helps us grow. here is the bottom line. congress should pass a budget that cut thin
on the floor. >> wife is here in -- >> my wife is president for the state board of education for west virginia. she's here most of the time. she gets back a week, a month. she's back home. we have a beautiful place in tucker valley. we'll meet there. all back up to fairmont. i have two daughters up in pennsylvania. so about an hour and a half. we try to get the family together as much as possible. but it's difficult. i never thought i'd be this home sick. >> let me ask you about your kids. what do they think of their dad's profession. >> we have a lot of conversations, my kids are independent, very intuitive. they're into it. >> debate a lot? >> we talk a lot. the girls in my family are strong, very opinionated, very strong willed and all successful in their own rights. as mothers, career, people don't end well. situations on physical issues. that's quite a party. >> is there another office that you'd like to hold. >> i keep thinking, there's more work to do here to figure out. i'm comfortable being governor. ready and prepared here. how do you get through the toxic atmosphere and how do you g
at the board of education meeting. she hopes to attend vanderbilt university to study medicine and one day join doctors without borders. i wish her luck in her future endeavors and i know she will make our fourth district proud. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i seek unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from michigan is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. this week unfortunately food stamps will be cut by $5 billion. we expected that. mr. kildee: what's worse is even more deeper cuts could follow. conferees start negotiating a farm bill this week, and billions of dollars -- in fact, $40 billion have been -- in cuts have been proposed by republicans in the house. 10 times the amount of cuts passed in the bipartisan bill in the senate. i've talked to dozens of people in my district who since i've been here in congress have come up to me and said, you know, thank you for fighting to preser
. the education system and afghanistan. so many of them, the number given to them is counterintuitive. so i do not use it. in terms of the lower grades, before you get to colleges and universities, before the taliban was driven out, to the extent they have been, 900,000 boys. now a million students in school . 3 million of those are girls. none of those who could've been educated before we got there with our allies. were 20,000e teachers, all male. is now 200,000 teachers. 60,000 of whom are women. health care much improved. child mortality significantly down. afghan refugees who fled pakistan have returned home. how is it that 67% of the american people recent survey think that the afghan war was not worth fighting? how did that happen? because the picture is much, much better than that number. i just don't believe that the american people have had a fair or fuller picture of the events in afghanistan. i believe that the press has missed a good story. it hasn't missed the problems. it has missed the progress. the impression that our people get doesn't come from either. it comes from what they
. never cut act in education, never cut back on rock rooms for our children or seniors. we expanded for people in need. we had ourselves financially strong. i come here and my number one goal is fix the finances. raising debt. sooner or later, someone has got to fix the debt. i hope to achieve. i'm working hard across the aisle, talking to everybody. is there a way we can move forward and fix our debt? in they became engrossed bowls since approach. it was the only thing i sought that was bipartisan. one of the first things that i saw when i got here. bipartisan, state -- state bipartisan and grew bipartisan and we couldn't get a vote. i think you're 18 people and they needed 14 and they got 11. had sixthe last time we and five agree on a financial direction for our country and couldn't get a vote on the floor? what drives me. >> let me conclude on a couple of personal nose. your wife is here in west virginia. >> my wife is now president of the state board of education in west virginia. she is back home and i try to go back home on weekends. have a beautiful place in tucker valley an
to make an health,mmitment to education, infrastructure, and finance investment that will secure our future. those three areas, taxes, medicare reforms, and budget fairness strike me as three areas where we can come together and find common ground. i look forward to working with all of you. >> thank you. cliburn.yburn -- mr. the task of this committee is to an agreement budget. while it would've been prudent to have these negotiations last summer, i am pleased that we are now beginning these important discussions. address the automatic spending cuts that are hurting our economy and undercutting important priorities like education, medical research, and national security. ation'smust put our n fiscal house in order and reduce our debt to a manageable level. there are different ways to do this. some are better than others. on the graph you see on the screens, there are two lines. the red line tops the deficit over the past six years. the blue line charts the unemployment rate over the same. -- period. down, theloyment goes deficit goes down. when unemployment goes up, the deficit goes
our country who are trying to save for their retirements, save for their children's college education, saving for their first home, are not harmed by confusing, costly regulations coming out of washington. mr. speaker, all americans know that a flood -- a flood -- of shington red tape has hurt our economy. that's why tens of millions of our fellow countrymen remain unemployeed or underemployed. unfortunately, more regulations are on the way. specifically today, mr. speaker, we are speaking about the securities and exchange commission and the department of labor who are headed toward proposing two massive and inconsistent rule makings. they're going to hurt the ability of retail investors to get financial advice that they need for their portion of the american dream. mr. speaker, retail investors are not big-time professionals on wall street. retail investors had no role in causing the financial crisis. and they should not be punished for it which reglet -- which regrettably this rule making could do. rather retailers are hardworking citizens from our congressional districts who buy an
educated work force, our low-energy costs, our abundant energy, our stable financial markets, our rule of law, strong intellectual property protection and so much more. that's why he launched the select u.s.a. program. the first ever federal effort to welcome additional investment to the united states. we've been very busy ever since, supporting both investors and economic development leaders as they make deals worth millions and even billions of dollars. we at the commerce department are horned to run this program that welcomes your investment and is helping create jobs. ladies and gentlemen, america is open for business. open for your business. president obama and i could not be more supportive of the investments you have made and will make here in the united states. please join me in welcoming my friend, the 44th president of the united states, barack obama. \[applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you. please have a seat. to my great friend, penny, thank you for the kind words, but more importantly, thank you for your outstanding leadership, for bringing us all together
mitigated conflicts across a rack -- across iraq. why would with the foundations of civic education and human rights for the institutions of education. u.s. ap is part of the partnerships we we have made. a lot remains to be done in iraq. the road ahead will not the easy. your excellency, we assure you and the iraqi people that as a rock prepares for the 2016 elections, iraq can count on the support of the u.s. institute of peace is a partner on all levels. starting with the communities, to local councils, two dialogues. thank you. [applause] >> i would like to ask beth jones to come forward. the format today will be an introduction of the prime minister by ambassador beth jones. then the prime minister will speak. and then sit and take questions. the audience already knows this. if you have questions, perhaps he of written them out, we are not going to have time for a great number of questions, but hopefully the prime minister will find questions interesting. with that, libby turn it over. >> thank you very much. welcome to the delegation. especially welcome, it is great to be here
the task of giving kids an equal education. -- dedicated to accomplishing the task of giving kids an equal education. they said they were going to back off of strong civil rights enforcement. i had to make a decision. do i uphold the law or back off of my principal? ini fight for what i believe or do i sacrifice my job? i lost my job. but i have never regretted the decision is standing for what you believe in. [applause] i went back to monterey and public service was still in my veins so i ran for congress and served a terms of the congress. eight terms. it was a different congress. el.er tip o'neill, bob michae we just honored tom foley the other day, speaker and a majority leader. republicans and democrats work together. toy work together to try solve the problems facing this country. yes, they had their differences. yes, they had their politics. when it came to issues affecting the country, they worked together for the common good and that's the way our democracy should work. [applause] clinton asked me then to take over the office of management and budget. the good people there helped
in getting it into the education system and am wondering if you could talk about that along with the press that we need to get people interested because it's all about selling new ideas. we don't talk about complexity. we live in a complex system. finally, last night i saw a play called "love in afghanistan." i think it's one of the most powerful plays of ever seen and i'm a performing arts junkie. i recommend everyone to go see it. it was fabulous. it addresses the things were talking about. >> it's a really important point. somebody brought over some young afghan music students about six months ago. it was terrific. we brought them to the capital so that some of my colleagues could see. i think there were like eight students on afghan instruments at a music school which could have never existed and they are there preserving their heritage. it has an impact when people can see a play or whatever, of course it does. telling stories are important. the problem on the other side is i'm not a good storyteller, by the way. i admire those of my colleagues who are. it's the most powerful way to g
any taxes at all. and he said while other countries are spending money on health care education and infrastructure we are spending unbelievable amounts on our military. do you think our military budget is sane when we are strapping our new generation with education debts that are unbelievable, what are your thoughts? guest: number one, yes, i understand what senator sanders is saying. corporations do receive credits, deductions, exclusions that could avoid -- that could result in them not having to pay their corporate income tax rate. i think one of the critical factors hopefully that congress can continue to address is corporate tax reform, in which case we could eliminate it. on defense spending, no question in my mind that additional reductions in defense spending are going to have to happen, are going to have to go forward and done in a way that focuses on strategic goals of protecting this country going forward. and yes, again, we are back to the same situation, balancing out those spending reductions, in defense, food stamps, child nutrition programs. we have to find a bal
disputes across iraq. we also put a foundation of civic education, human rights, and religious moderation for the institutions of education. usip and its partners are proud of the progress we have made. we also recognize a lot remains to be done in iraq, and we see from the unfortunate tragic violence that has still cost many lives the road ahead will not be easy. your excellency, we assure you and the iraqi people that as iraq prepare for the 2014 elections and faces challenges to a secure better future for the people, iraq and kept on the support of the u.s. institute for peace for a partner on all levels, starting with the community, two local councils, to international dialogue. thank you. >> i would like to ask the ambassador to come forward. the format today will be an introduction -- it will be an introduction of the prime minister by the ambassador, and then the prime minister will speak and then sit and take questions. the audience already knows this. if you have questions, perhaps you have already written them out, we will not have time for a great number of questions, and hopef
the past few decades, these public efforts have helped educate people and promote awareness about breast cancer. but we must remain vigilant in the fight because there's still so much more to be done. the statistics are sobering. one in eight women will get breast cancer in her lifetime. this disease strikes women and some men of all backgrounds, races, ethnicities and ages. while all women are at risk, many still think it can't happen to them, especially young women. but i know all too well that it can. in 2007 when i was just 41 years old, i learned i had breast cancer. while we've made significant advances on some fronts, recent studies show that more and more young women are being diagnosed with breast cancer and rates are not going down. i believe we have a responsibility as members of congress to take breast cancer awareness month one step further and turn awareness into action. we must take action to implement the affordable care act and continue to ensure that every single person in this country has access to the information they need to make informed decisions about their health
to the future, we need to make it stronger by improving worker training and education, upgrading our infrastructure, and growing our manufacturing base. the truth is, there are additional things we can add and do to make america even stronger as a magnet for investment. before talking about what make ours economy such an attractive place to invest, and what we plan to do to make it even more atrabtive, i'd like to start by saying a few words about the state of the world economy. there's broad evidence of recovery across the global landscape. economic conditions, particularly in advanced economies, have improved, but there's no doubt that global command is not where it needs to be. in too many countries, unemployment levels are unacceptably high, especially among young people. as i said before, leaders around the world should make strengthening demand and creating jobs a priority to unlock growth that's robust, sustainable, and balanced. looking at europe, it seems the long recession is slowly fading even as critical steps have been taken to restore financial stability. this is good n
hill. on tuesday, maryland -- marilyn thenner will come before senate health, education, labor, and pensions committee. her agency is responsible for overseeing the healthcare.gov website. that hearing will be live at 10:00 a.m. eastern live on c- span. a day later, hhs secretary kathleen sebelius will testify before this -- the senate finance committee. we will have that live wednesday at 10 a.m. eastern, also here on c-span. >> what's the most important issue congress should consider in 2014? that's the question for middle and high school students in c- span's "student can" video competition. make it 5-7 minute documentary that shows a variant points of view and includes c-span video for your chance to win the grand prize of $5,000. this year, we have double the number of winners in total prizes. entries must be in by january 20, 2014. need more information? go to studentcam.org. "newsmakers"next, with agriculture sector a tom bill sat. he talks about the farm bill and its ties to the u.s. economy. after a hearing -- after that, a hearing on stand your ground laws. at 8:00 p.
, but more proud of title 9, 1973, this country came to make sure of equality for women in education and that includes sports. and the result is women in athletics that are amazing and entertaining. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. ellison: i congratulate them. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek wreck his? -- seek recognition? the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to say thank you to a friend of mine, mayor james r. bobbing, who has dedicated 45 years of service to the city of granville in the second district. in the last 29 he he served as mayor. mayor bobbing has been recognized countless times for his leadership and commitment to west michigan. most recently he received the michigan municipal league michael a. guideo leadership and public leadership service award. in addition he serves as the chairman of the grandville council which plays a leading role in fostering public and private cooperation to enhance quality of
-sex couples. also, how they respond when gays seek a religious education or communion for children. soughtormation was also on pastoral care of men and women who live together outside of marriage. the national catholic reporter broke the story on thursday and posted a copy online. michael is in miamisburg, ohio. republican line, what is the top story for you? -- i hit the wrong button. independent line. caller: hello. thank you very much. receiverld you put the up? it is hard to hear you? caller: sure. host: thank you. caller: can you hear me now? is abouttory for me health insurance and getting sick erie it i think a lot of debate is making people sick. they're worried about their health now. this will make them anxious and more prone to disease. the only solution is to try not to get sick. that is all an individual can do. avoid accidents in dangerous situations. -- a lote i am smoking of people know what to do. i would stay away from doctors if i could. when i go to the doctor, he has all of this fancy equipment. 30 years ago, they did not have all that stuff. we are able to be
'm going to be able to become to doing so. in education system afghanistan, not just higher education, but so many universities that the number of them even to me as counterintuitive so i don't use them. before you get to colleges and universities and before the taliban and was driven out, and they said they have been, 9000 now onethe schools am million. about 3 million of them are girls but none of them could have been educated before we got there with our allies. 2001, there were 20,000 teachers, all-male. there are now 200,000 teachers, 60,000 of them are women. improved., much child mortality, significantly down. 5 million afghan refugees fled to pakistan and have returned .ome is it that 67% of the american people in the most recent survey think the afghan war was not worth fighting? how does that happen? the picture is much, much better number.t i just don't believe that the american people have had a fair or more full picture of the events in afghanistan. i believe the press has missed a good story. it has not missed of the problems but it has missed the progress. the impressio
$1 trillion. we should be doing more to help people get a higher education, not less. -- not less in this country. the document that was presented by the other side that will be subject to negotiation at the conference committee also cuts assistance and spending on medicaid by the amount of $810 billion. that's not hyperbole, that's in the house republican budget. notwithstanding the fact that the majority of people who benefit from medicaid assistance in this country are actually children and the disabled and senior citizens. so we've got very different priorities, blue prints, road maps as it relates to dealing with the problems that we confront here in america. the balanced approach that we advocate for essentially has four different elements. first, we believe it's important to invest in the american economy. it's time to invest in america. invest in job training and education, transportation and infrastructure, research and development, technology and innovation. let's invest in america. so we can create increased economic activity. we're in the midst of a very schizophrenic
of you know and many of you probably were educated in the united states. i cannot tell you how many heads of state and finance ministers throughout government, heads of state and chief executives who i need as i travel the world as a senator to go to school who participated in educational exchanges and the fulbright program, meet them everywhere. foreign ministers in saudi arabia who has been foreign minister for 30 years or more. he proudly reminds me of his education at princeton. and another showed me a photograph and said this was you and me 25, 35 years ago when i met you at a law of diplomacy school when you were a senator. many immigrants know that the american dream is not restricted to those born in america. if you go to miami, chicago, san francisco, any major city in america, you will find a community that speaks your language and understand your culture and welcomes diversity and can serve as an anchor for your next venture. it is not just the big cities. you heard it from secretary pritzker and president obama. success stories. indian manufacturers expanding plants in upstate
of the very proud city of spokane. this commitment to furthering education in his own district, washington's 50, is testified to by the ralph and hagans library at gonzaga university, his alma mater. it is named in honor of his parents, who did something right in raising such a son. tom foley was a modest man whose impact on the public wheel beyond his district far exceeded any projection of the ego or strength. may we all be inspired by his example to be men and women compelled to improve the life and prospect of our fellow citizens while eschewing any honor or glory. do our part to increase understanding and respect across cultural divides. be present with us this day, o god, as we mark his life and remember his legacy. bless this gathering and comfort us as we comfort one another in remembering a great american and a genuinely good man. amen. >> tom foley was my friend, mentor, and colleague in the house of representatives. i first met him at the university of washington law school in 1965 during his freshman term. he was a brilliant young man with a warm and friendly smile. it was his
the policy right, you use the resources more effectively, and you would educe the cost of a program -- the program the right way. they're going to take somewhere etween three million and 4 million people who otherwise qualify for this row gram, and disqualify them or make it much harder for them to access this program. it will not be beneficial to the communities, and the grocery force -- stores that are dependent on those who come in and buy enough food to take care of their families. when you look at the pokes in rural america -- folks in rural america, 30 six percent -- 36% of the family budget is spent on ood. when the stimulus increase was reduced, $36 a month means a lot to those families. it means a great deal to the grocery stores in the small communities that are struggling to survive who need those additional opportunities for the customer to come in and take care of their families. you have to look at the people and the challenges behind this program to really understand that you have to get the policy right. >> do you have some numbers for the american public to better u
-mails, out of our contact, out of our reading list, personal finances, education records, we want the government to stop wasting our money trying to prove that they are protecting us. in 1775, patrick henry said, give me liberty, or give me death. we demand life and liberty. we claim life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness as our rightful inheritance as americans. [applause] this was the promise of the declaration of independence written by thomas jefferson. to secure these rights governments are instituted among men and women deriving just powers from the government that goverened that whenever any form of government becomes described to -- destructive of these ends it is the right of people to alter or abolish it and institute new government. if these words, written by thomas jefferson sound radical today, it is because the u.s. government has buried far from from the spirit of july 4, 1776, a spirit not just of revolution, but evolution, of the awareness that the legitimacy of the state depended on the support of the natural rights of its citizens. we are here to reawaken that
services. the one thing we try to do in the aca is give more money for graduate medical education to encourage more folks to it to medical school. host: our guest, congress woman diana degette, serves the first district of colorado, democrat . she is the top democrat on the oversight and investigations subcommittee. we will go to paul next in pittsburgh, republican caller. hi, paul. caller: good morning. i would like to start thinking c-span for allowing us to have this unfiltered conversation that is important for the people to hear all of this. , ipent 30 years in the navy will be very brief. when the admiral was running an exercise, we would write the plan and then he would just call all the department heads in and go over all the details until he was completely satisfied that this was going to be executed properly. we call that leadership. it is an ingredient that apparently is missing in our government at the top level. it is inconceivable to me that you could after having the time that you had to roll this plan out to have this kind of a disaster, and everybody to deny knowl
exciting thing may an entire industry of lower-cost educational devices that every student has. now suddenly, you have education content among not from textbooks, etc. we obviously are very focused for jobs reasons and infrastructure reasons to improve our airports, roads, bridges. we need all that, and that is partly an idea of fiscal of our tax laws. we're working on that. keep our eye on the 21st century because that type -- one of the first mover jumps that the united states got at the end of the 1990's is our small businesses and entrepreneurs were using the internet first and foremost. that generated a lot of inventory improvement, and growth and productivity spur we productivity's bird we had -- productivity spurt we had. one of things i want to say, we are doing selectusa here, but we learn from other countries. we look at what south korea is doing on universal broadband for schools. we listened, when the president did his in sourcing for them, he listened to other countries why they chose another country on things that we could have done better, and it has affected what we
. we have mitigated disputes across iraq. we also put a foundation of civic education, human rights, and religious moderation for the institutions of education. ip and its partners are proud of the progress we have made. we also recognize a lot remains to be done in iraq, and we see from the unfortunate tragic violence that has still cost many lives the road ahead will not be easy. you excellency, we assure and the iraqi people that as iraq prepare for the 2014 elections and faces challenges to a secure better future for the people, iraq and kept on the support of the u.s. institute for peace for a partner on all levels, starting with the community, two local councils, to international dialogue. thank you. ask theld like to ambassador to come forward. the format today will be an introduction -- come here. it will be an introduction of the prime minister i the ambassador, and in the prime minister will speak. and then sit and take questions. the audience already knows this. if you have questions, perhaps you have already written them out, we will not have time for a great number of q
and -- as the center of who we are as a nation. transforming education and economically driven immigration system and energy policy based on north american resources and american ingenuity and committed family life over start prosperity for many americans to what we had today. there is another important part of this. economic freedom in all of its forms will sustain prosperity over the long haul. no one understood that editor -- that better than jack. driving american supply-side economic and carrying -- tearing down the barriers in the capital leftm for those who are behind. those policies lead to exponential growth that we the leadership of ronald reagan. many people benefited from that .rowth than what we have today conservatives need to advance economic freedom for this of a vacation of the tax code and lower tax rates. these of the lost productivity, the lost jobs, misallocated capital from the convoluted tax code in the world. conservatives need to advance economic freedom through advocating a monetary policy that does not punish savers and job creating small businesses. our current policy
that is specifically designed for either outreach and education, so health centers hired education and outreach people as part of their outreach for health personnel. i would say it's definitely related cause to get expanded health care. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, mr. chairman, thank you madam secretary for being here. my understanding is that a lot of the companies insurers that have been offering plans in the individual market, the ones sending out these notices, are actually repositioning themselves in the health insurance exchange to offer alternative plans. is that -- >> yes. >> and in addition to those insurers who have been in the individual market, you have a lot of other companies and insurers providing plans in health insurance market? >> that is true. >> so the way i look at this. i went to buy oriole tickets when the season was underway. they closed the window. i didn't have to go home because they opened another window a few feet away. so essentially what's happening is people are coming up on the renewal period and getting up to the window, the individual market and being
of education. will the prime minister please use his good offices to ensure the failed application is incorporated its inquiry? have aously, we need to proper policy of making sure that proposals for preschools are ready to go ahead before they go ahead. it is worth making the point that when you look at the free schools in our country, two thirds of them have been judged to be good or outstanding which is a higher proportion than schools within the state sector. so think it is worth not just continuing with this policy by putting rocket boosters on its frequency many more free schools in our country. >> on question nine," and, mr. iorge howard heard >> discussed with mayor george anderson the prospects for the city in terms of overseas investment and the importance of this international festival. i also met hillsboro families. ministerhe prime accept that government support to local government should be related to need? that, how does he explain the households in our region have lost him he pounds over the last two years where the households in his region have gained six? >> is th
you bridge some of the handicaps of distance so they can have access to educational opportunities and health care opportunities. the technology in some ways takes on an even greater role.. >> given the geographical issue you have been talking about, what is a legislative or policy issue you are promoting? >> one of the tenets that is incredibly important is universal service. the idea that all americans, no matter where you live, should have access to comparable and affordable telecommunications services. as we have gone over this -- through this evolution from plain old telephone service to a broadband world, how do we ensure rural americans have access to those same services and applications that come across on those networks? that has been a big focus for us , legislatively, and with the talkingking -- fcc, about how important it is, what that means, and how that mechanism has allowed folks in rural, high-cost areas to have comparable services.. matthewng us is schwartz, a reporter with medications daily. >> thank you. fcc instituted massive reforms of the universal service reg
would probably go abroad were you can get free education, free medical benefits, and not worry about the racial issues. host: if it is free, who pays for it to? caller: not sure who pays for the listening to your program and listening to other countries , i would less stressed at least give them an opportunity. you mean denmark, right -- right?er: caller: denmark. host: monti has this point -- you can call in to join the conversation -- do you feel you have the opportunity to get ahead in america ayako from michigan, jessica is up next. good morning. -- in america? from michigan, jessica is up next. good morning. caller: it is hard to get ahead in america when asians are taking our jobs here and taking our jobs overseas. the media believes we need a bunch of schooling to get ahead. i think that is wrong. host: thank you for the call. looking at the comparison of the chart we showed you from 1952 -- james is next from grand forks, north to code up. you say you do not have the opportunity to get ahead in this country, why? i have to say no i have to say that is where i come from. , c-s
, son of the very proud city of spokane. his commitment to furthering education in his own district, washington's fifth, is testified higgins-foley library at gonzaga university, his alma mater. it is named in honor of his parents who clearly did something right in raising such a son. tom foley was a modest man whose impact on the public wheel beyond his district far exceeded any projection of the ego or strength. may we all be inspired by his example to be men and women compelled to improve the life and prospect of our fellow issuing any honor or glory for ourselves. -- eschewing any honor or glory. do our part to increase understanding and respect across cultural divides. be present with us this day, o god, as we mark his life and remember his legacy. bless this gathering and comfort us as we comfort one another in remembering a great american and a genuinely good man. amen. >> tom foley was my friend, mentor, and colleague in the house of representatives. i first met him at the university of washington law school in 1965 during his freshman term. he was a brilliant young man with
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